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As the Director of Research at the Queensland Centre for Gynaecological Cancer I lead a team of up to 20 researchers. We research and develop the best standard of care for women experiencing gynaecological cancer, which includes finding cures for cancer, preventing cancer, and finding better treatment options. The Queensland Centre for Gynaecological Cancer Research website can be found here www.gyncan.org

Very good evidence suggests that patients treated in large centres, in which research is carried out on a regular basis do better than patients treated in small hospitals. I am actively  recruiting patients in one or more of our collaborative clinical studies.

Retrospective Clinical Studies

These studies focus on rare tumours, where only little information is available in the literature. Patients with rare tumours are seen more often in the Queensland Centre for Gynaecological Cancer because our centre is one of the largest centres treating women with gynaecological cancer world-wide and documents several of those rare tumours every year. The knowledge accumulated by these studies helps us to improve the treatment for women with rare cancers further.

Prospective Clinical Trials

Decisions on cancer treatment should be based on clinical trials whenever possible. As a principle, the new (investigative) treatment is compared to the current standard treatment. Patients are allocated randomly to one of the treatment types in order to avoid a selection bias. Outside the clinical trial the new treatment is not available until the trial has demonstrated a benefit over the current standard treatment. Generally, patients treated within clinical trials have a better outcome compared to patients who are not treated in clinical trials. As the Director of Research Gynaecological Oncology I am currently involved in developing and managing clinical trials in gynaecological cancers.

Basic and Translational Research

The focus of the basic and translational research program is the application of new technology (molecular, biochemical, imaging and surgical) to prevention, detection and therapy for gynaecological cancers. I will ask patients to participate in these trials because I expect a benefit for future generations of cancer patients. I do not expect a benefit for my actual patient. My interest focuses on factors, which mediate tumour growth and metastasis.

Quality of Life Research

Cancer specialists are aware that not only the survival time but also the quality of life is a key factor in cancer treatment. This is especially important when two treatments are equally effective but cause different side-effects. My Quality-of-Life research focuses on ovarian, endometrial and vulval cancer. I wish to provide the best, most effective and modern treatment to my patients with least possible changes in quality of life.

As the Director of Research at the Queensland Centre for Gynaecological Cancer I direct a team of up to 20 researchers. We research and develop the best standard of care for women experiencing gynaecological cancer, which includes finding cures for cancer, preventing cancer, and find better treatment options. The Queensland Centre for Gynaecological Cancer Research website can be found here www.gyncan.org

Very good evidence suggests that patients treated in large centres, in which research is carried out on a regular basis do better than patients treated in small hospitals. I am actively  recruiting patients in one or more of our collaborative clinical studies.

Retrospective Clinical Studies: These studies focus on rare tumours, where only little information is available in the literature. Patients with rare tumours are seen more often in the Queensland Centre for Gynaecological Cancer because our centre is one of the largest centres treating women with gynaecological cancer world-wide and documents several of those rare tumours every year. The knowledge accumulated by these studies helps us to improve the treatment for women with rare cancers further.

Prospective Clinical Trials: Decisions on cancer treatment should be based on clinical trials whenever possible. As a principle, the new (investigative) treatment is compared to the current standard treatment. Patients are allocated randomly to one of the treatment types in order to avoid a selection bias. Outside the clinical trial the new treatment is not available until the trial has demonstrated a benefit over the current standard treatment. Generally, patients treated within clinical trials have a better outcome compared to patients who are not treated in clinical trials. As the Director of Research Gynaecological Oncology I am currently involved in developing and managing clinical trials in gynaecological cancers.
 

Basic and Translational Research: The focus of the basic and translational research program is the application of new technology (molecular, biochemical, imaging and surgical) to prevention, detection and therapy for gynaecological cancers. I w

As the Director of Research at the Queensland Centre for Gynaecological Cancer I direct a team of up to 20 researchers. We research and develop the best standard of care for women experiencing gynaecological cancer, which includes finding cures for cancer, preventing cancer, and find better treatment options. The Queensland Centre for Gynaecological Cancer Research website can be found here www.gyncan.org

Very good evidence suggests that patients treated in large centres, in which research is carried out on a regular basis do better than patients treated in small hospitals. I am actively  recruiting patients in one or more of our collaborative clinical studies.

Retrospective Clinical Studies: These studies focus on rare tumours, where only little information is available in the literature. Patients with rare tumours are seen more often in the Queensland Centre for Gynaecological Cancer because our centre is one of the largest centres treating women with gynaecological cancer world-wide and documents several of those rare tumours every year. The knowledge accumulated by these studies helps us to improve the treatment for women with rare cancers further.

Prospective Clinical Trials: Decisions on cancer treatment should be based on clinical trials whenever possible. As a principle, the new (investigative) treatment is compared to the current standard treatment. Patients are allocated randomly to one of the treatment types in order to avoid a selection bias. Outside the clinical trial the new treatment is not available until the trial has demonstrated a benefit over the current standard treatment. Generally, patients treated within clinical trials have a better outcome compared to patients who are not treated in clinical trials. As the Director of Research Gynaecological Oncology I am currently involved in developing and managing clinical trials in gynaecological cancers.

Basic and Translational Research: The focus of the basic and translational research program is the application of new technology (molecular, biochemical, imaging and surgical) to prevention, detection and therapy for gynaecological cancers. I will ask patients to participate in these trials because I expect a benefit for future generations of cancer patients. I do not expect a benefit for my actual patient. My interest focuses on factors, which mediate tumour growth and metastasis.

Quality of Life Research: Cancer specialists are aware that not only the survival time but also the quality of life is a key factor in cancer treatment. This is especially important when two treatments are equally effective but cause different side-effects. My Quality-of-Life research focuses on ovarian, endometrial and on vulval Cancer. I wish to provide the best, most effective and modern treatment to my patients with least possible changes in quality of life.

ill ask patients to participate in these trials because I expect a benefit for future generations of cancer patients. I do not expect a benefit for my actual patient. My interest focuses on factors, which mediate tumour growth and metastasis.

Quality of Life Research: Cancer specialists are aware that not only the survival time but also the quality of life is a key factor in cancer treatment. This is especially important when two treatments are equally effective but cause different side-effects. My Quality-of-Life research focuses on ovarian, endometrial and on vulval Cancer. I wish to provide the best, most effective and modern treatment to my patients with least possible changes in quality of life.